Alex's Analysis - Azzanadra's Quest

posted by Alex 43 on 28 February 2021 at 16:59 | Discuss on our Forums

In short: it was awesome and you should definitely experience it by going in blind.

In long: ... hoh boy, why does everyone always want it in long?

NOTE: As always, there are spoilers for all sorts of quests here. If you read them and stuff gets spoiled, it's your own fault. You should've been doing all these quests from the day they're released. And you call yourself a RuneScape fan...

Azzanadra's Quest is the next in the long series that, for the moment, defines RuneScape. Everything we've done; all the skill training, the questing, the bossing; all of that we have done is leading up to this great story that holds the fate of the world and the rest of the universe in jeopardy. If we don't stop this great threat that threatens even the lesser Gods themselves, then all that we have done; all our trillions of coins and quadrillions of exp... will be gone. Poof. Out.

... yeah. I like having all my stuff, thanks. Let's stop Gielinor from getting exploded please.

So, let's summarize how we got here for a bit. The series started with hints and clues to the existence to the Elder Gods by gradually revealing artifacts and things like the Stone of Jas, the names of the Gods, the existence of Mah, and the Dragonkin's curse. A bunch of things that hold their own questlines, all centering around the powers and capabilities of divine beings beyond comprehension. Couple that with the introduction of the Gods themselves and the starting of a new God Wars that ends in Sliske's Endgame, and we've finally, at long last, reached the point where we now understand what the entire plot of RuneScape is.

Yes. Almost 20 years later, and we've finally finished the introductory chapters of RuneScape. Now, @#$% is about to get REAL.

The main players in this story, aside from you, are Seren and Zaros. They are the most Godly of the Gods, and like you, they both seek to stop the Elder Gods in their own ways. Seren hopes to unify Gielinor's races and appease the Elder Gods through worldwide collaboration, while Zaros intends to become an Elder God himself so he could convince them to stand down.

Of course, neither side have been making much headway, and we are running out of time. We ended up getting sidelined by Kerapec who put his own spin on the situation; destroy the Elder Gods by blowing up Gielinor. ... which is the "we lose our trillions of coins" result, so that needed to be stopped, ironically, by the Elder God Jas herself.


So, that's where we had last left off, and Zaros' bro-fist general, Azzanadra, decides that we cannot rely on Seren, and asks our help in locating the Elder Halls so that we can better figure out how to deal with this threat. Zaros does have the whole "knowledge is power" shtick down pretty well; I'm surprised he doesn't get along well with Saradomin... foreshadowing...


Fortunately, you've got a new helper. Trindine, who is a Mahjarrat that was sealed away into the shadow realm for a good long time, and by pairing up with her, Ariane, and Sir Owen (signature heroes, yay!), you begin a long and arduous quest that may or may not have taken a page from One Small Favour (yay!) to seek out the Elder Halls.


You start by following Azzanadra around on Freneskae (excellent reuse of game assets) and investigate the egg debris. With Ariane's help, you start understanding how the Elder Gods plan on destroying Gielinor. Or rather, how it's but a side effect of their true goal. You learn how Freneskae is destroyed via epic voice-acted video, and since it's a cycle-based event, you can attribute it to the current issue at hand.


Fortunately, you're already a few steps ahead. Mah never escaped Freneskae and Jas turned her egg into the Stone of Jas, which means we only have 3 Elder God eggs to worry about rather than 5. That helps make this task feel quite a bit more doable; perhaps with their more limited numbers, a compromise might be possible.

This is an important addition to the story, because until now, we've not been able to even make the Elder Gods do much of anything on their own accord, save for making Jas ask a question and forge an item to stop Kerapec, and that's with Seren's assistance. If the stakes are so overwhelming, then the solution would have to be just as overwhelming, but since the Elder Gods are the most powerful beings on Gielinor by an exponential amount, a solution to this issue would have to come almost out of thin air. Or one of the Elder Gods would have to defect.

This is known as pacing in storytelling. While that would be neat to have a deus ex to save everything, it doesn't flow well for the story, which until now, has been nothing but buildup. That would be the lazy way to end things, and it would lead to the most disappointing quest in RuneScape history.

And we can't have that. Quests are awesome!


From there, we start brainstorming ways to figure out where the Elder Halls are. We start by asking for Saradomin's help, as he's got an elder artifact that lets him locate others. After doing the white knights one small favor (heh heh...), Saradomin admits that his crown doesn't let him find the Elder God Eggs, as he's tried it himself. So, that was a bust.

Then, we go around researching into the Elder Halls using bits and scraps of information we can salvage from large sources of info, like the Wizard's Tower and Guthix's Memory Archives.


Now, if you guys remember from the Mahjarrat questline, this is exactly what we did for the buildup to the Ritual of the Mahjarrat quest. We helped Ali the Wise gather up bits and pieces of these powerful characters and prepared ourselves for the great and final battle, where all these mahjarrat appeared and fought this crazy war. And despite the chaos, we all knew exactly what was happening because we had affiliated ourselves with these characters before. This is how final battles in video games play out and what makes them so epic; their familiarity. How you know what to do, who everyone is, and why they are even fighting; all before the battle even begins.

That's what we're doing right now. Getting bits and pieces to the whole truth, just like how long storybook series usually go. A tried and true formula.


Although, in the case of Guthix... well, he just goes ahead and lore-bombs us about how we, the World Guardian, actually are supposed to work. Apparently we were HIS solution to the whole Elder God issue, and he even manipulated Sliske to kill him, which drove him to have at us, all for the sake of making us stronger. Which, as Endgame showed, is exactly what happened. I mean, Guthix's death was originally a tragedy, but now, with all these explanations into the matter (some of which we even time-travel and ask Guthix himself about), it's starting to feel more like a 600IQ move by the God of Balance himself. Mad respects, dude.

At some point in the quest, we wound up running into a Dragonkin clan, and chaos ensued.


... who at one point terraformed the TzHaar city.


Eventually, Ariane has the great idea to... I kid you not... snort the Elder God mouthpieces' dust to figure out where the Elder Halls are. And it works. Boom, out of nowhere, despite our prior failures and attempts to gather info, the situation is solved just like that.


We head on down to the Heart of Gielinor and enter the Elder Halls and... oh hey, there they are! The Eggs! Mission Accomplished!

... heh. Right? You remember what I said about pacing and deus ex earlier? This could've been a three-quest series to find the Elder Halls, and we just got handed a golden ticket straight to them. What's the big deal?

Well, the quest isn't over yet. It's not called the Elder Hall's Quest. It's called Azzanadra's Quest.

See, as it turns out, while you were researching the Elder Halls, Azzanadra and Trindine were researching Saradomin's Crown. They had a plan to steal it.


... and they did.


THAT was the quest! Surprise twist! Jagex are so GOOD at those! For example, Missing Presumed Death is all about the Gods. V's Quest is all about Dragonkin. Zamorak's Heist quest is (sorta) about Nomad. Kindred Spirits (barrows brothers quest) is all about Sliske.

And I LOVE that! I love these twists because that allows the quests to be advertised and hyped up without actually revealing the true plot points. It makes the quests so much more exciting because you have no idea what's going to happen! I was absolutely mind-blown when I discovered that the Zarosians were going to steal Saradomin's Crown. Which, you know, makes him a God and all. They've effectively just killed Saradomin, one of the most pivotal and well-known Gods of the whole freaking GAME!

But that's just it. RuneScape's been a progressing storyline even since the Sixth Age began. With Guthix's death, the whole formula had changed from the Gods being omnipotent watchers of the game to becoming disposable characters of their own. Characters we respect and idolize. It allows us to get to know them, to fight along side them, to see their own struggles, and... most importantly... to see us SURPASS them.

And that right there is why we continue to play RuneScape. To surpass. To gain those levels, to beat our friends at bossing and PvP, to get all of the money gold coins of the universe and the banks, and to achieve the skills needed to take on new challenges as they come.

This is why this quest was so darn epic. It followed Jagex's tried-and-true formula to the letter, it actually progressed the whole Elder Gods storyline as opposed to deviate from it like Kerapec's series did, and it put us in a position where we are going to start both looking for our own solution, and pitting ourselves against the two key players: Seren and Zaros.

Because if we learned something from Saradomin's fall from power, it's that the Gods aren't invincible, and it's only a matter of time before we're going to end up challenging Seren and Zaros themselves.


Question now is... who's side are you on?

Until next time,

Cheers, cannoneers!


The lore walls come crashing down with Azzanadra’s Quest. The first in what can only be described as a RuneScape visual novel. We uncover twists and turmoil as we learn about Zarosian impulses, the World Guardian, Elder Halls, and the Temple Knights.

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Smaller quests, bigger stakes

posted by Cireon on 19 February 2021 at 17:21 | Discuss on our Forums

Many games are built to fulfil a fantasy of their players. Whether that be being a pilot, the designer of a theme park, or a slayer of demons. Being the hero of a story is a recurring theme in games, and so games are built around that experience. So too in RuneScape: everything is built to make you feel like the hero of the story. No evil is big enough to beat you!

That entire fantasy would shatter if you realised that not just your story is fabricated, but the entire world has been built around you, to give you that experience. Of course, when we think about it, we know this to be true at all times. To really immerse ourselves in the experience, we need something called suspension of disbelief. This is the act of actively suppressing our critical or logical thinking to immerse ourselves in the content, and enjoy it more. The closer a game (or any world building, whether it be a book, a movie, or even a D&D campaign) is to our expectations of reality, the easier it for us to suspend or disbelief.

If we are to design an immersive experience for our users/players, we want to avoid things that pull them out of the experience. If we give players of our game indication that the world is paper thin, and that the player's experience is the only thing that really exists, it is likely the player will find it hard to believe in the world, and as such they cannot fulfil their fantasies. What's the point in being the hero of the story, if you know it's just a story to make you feel like a hero? You haven't earned it, you haven't worked for it, it's thrown in your lap.

We can make the game hard enough to make the player feel like they earned it, or make a game character driven in such a way that it's not a story about us, but that we are sucked into the story from an outside perspective (like books and films do). Coming back to RuneScape though, RuneScape is an RPG, a role-playing game. It is a big open world in which we get to fill in the blanks of our character. We make a difference in the world, and we choose in what way. Over the past few years, we've seen a lot of quests in which our character was at the forefront of large - sometimes almost apocalyptic - changes. Our actions mattered... or did they?

If the world of Gielinor was bland and empty, filled with NPCs who give you some fetch quests, and nothing more, then you would never feel emotionally attached to it, and the choices you make would feel empty. We come back to the original problem: the world turns into a world created just for you, to play your part and nothing more.

Whenever I run a D&D campaign, I make sure that I think about what happens outside of the world. In one campaign, a war was raging while the players left to a monastery in search of knowledge. When they returned months later, a successful winter campaign had caused a large shift in the balance of power in the war. The refugees the players met before, happy to have fled the war, had gotten caught up right in the middle of it once more. This one group of refugees the players talked with conveyed the story of so many more. While it's unlikely the players could've done anything, they now had a real stake in this conflict through talking to a few unimportant individuals.

While in D&D, I can make any person a player decides to talk to come alive with a made up on the spot backstory, that's much harder in games, where everything needs to be scripted. This is why I like small quests in RuneScape so much. They add a much needed depth to the world. They help making it easier for us to suspend our disbelief, and immerse ourselves into a world that maybe isn't built just for us. A world in which every NPC has their own life, as rich is our own; we just don't know about it.

Finally, small quests allow us to just do our thing. It is much closer to reality that we help people with small tasks around than literally stopping the gods from destroying the world. Again, small quests provide the necessary framework for us to transport ourselves into the world in Gielinor. To willingly forget it's just a game with a made up story, and the have emotions about what happens to the characters in the world.

Done right, games are a powerful and unique storytelling tool, but there are also many mistakes to be made that can pull you out of the narrative immersion. A while ago, I wrote about ludonarrative dissonance in Desperate Times, and in this article I explained how a world without depth can break our suspension of disbelief, and remove any weight our decisions may have. With the new direction of smaller quests and lore dotted around the game, I think RuneScape is moving in a very positive direction. Gielinor is an interesting, large complex world that is becoming more and more alive, one small quest at a time.


We are just days away from Azzanadra's quest and the kick off of the Elder God Wars. What should you expect, what characters are involved, and will your expectations be met? Also what do the Elder God Wars look like and is this an expansion in disguise?

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Forgotten Lore V - Hazeel

posted by shiro_shana on 15 February 2021 at 03:42 | Discuss on our Forums

In light of the 20th anniversary of RuneScape, everyone reminisces about their first moments as a player. When I became a RuneScape member for the first time, I went on a questing spree, starting with the Hazeel Cult quest.  Back then, of course, Hazeel was not like we know him today. In the old days, Hazeel was just a big bad mage, and the main enemy of Ardougne. This, of course, has been reworked by Jagex to make Hazeel fit in possibly the biggest storyline of the game. So, for this instalment, I present to you: Hazeel the Mahjarrat (?)

Back in the good old Freneskae days, there were a few native tribes. Among these tribes were the Chelon-Mah, Mahjarrat, Mahserrat and the Mahkorat. All of the tribes suffered the curse that is the Rejuvenation ritual.  In order for the Freneskae natives to rejuvenate, they had to sacrifice one another. Seeing as none of the tribes wanted to sacrifice their own kind, conflict ensued. Because the Mahserrat refused to participate in this mad ritual, they became priority targets for the other tribes to use as a sacrifice. Among the Mahserrat was someone called Hazeel. Hazeel saw the end of his kind coming and decided to forsake his own tribe and join the Mahjarrat. He even went as far as permanently growing some horns to distinguish himself from the Mahserrat. From this moment on, Hazeel was a Mahjarrat by loyalty and his story intertwines with theirs.

As you all know, the Mahjarrat travelled to Gielinor to aid Icthlarin in his war against Zaros. During this war, it is known that Hazeel and the Menaphite armies successfully fought against the Zarosian armies. However, due to a dispute between Sliske and Icthlarin, the Mahjarrat switched sides and joined Zaros. In the Zarosian army, he obtained the rank of Legatus. One desperate Tumeken explosion and one Azzanadra shield later, many of the Mahjarrat died. Hazeel was among the living and continued fighting in the war. Later, Hazeel made an appearance when a fierce warrior named Torva destroyed the attacking flock of Ripper demons. Even after yelling “when you need something done right, you need to do it yourself”, he failed to kill Torva, causing Nex to be interested in recruiting Torva.

Fast forwarding some time to the great Zamorak betrayal, Hazeel’s job was to keep the Zarosian followers at bay while Zamorak stabbed the Empty Lord. After Zamorak’s ascension and the beginning of the God Wars, Hazeel was known as a loyal and feared Zamorakian warrior. Though not many details of his actions during the God Wars are known. It is known that Hazeel became the new-born Khazard’s tutor. Khazard’s mother Palkeera died soon after Khazard’s birth. After the God Wars ended and all of the gods were banished from the planet, Khazard and Hazeel fought together against the Saradominist armies in Kandarin. Their efforts were very successful, as they conquered almost all of Kandarin.

In the early years of the Fifth Age, a group of Saradominists assaulted Hazeel’s mansion and killed everyone inside. They were unable to kill Hazeel, though, but they managed to disable him and put him into a torpor state. The Carnilleans, leaders of the assault, claimed the mansion and ruled the city of Ardougne which was constructed not long after.


Image Source: RuneScape Wiki
We’ve finally reached the present of this story. Here’s where things get tricky. During the quest Hazeel Cult, the player is given a choice. Will they aid the Carnilleans or will our hero choose Hazeel’s side? If they sided with Hazeel’s cult, Hazeel will return and travel north to join the upcoming ritual of Rejuvenation. If not, Hazeel will remain in his coffin and not be able to attend the ritual. During the ritual, assuming Hazeel was resurrected in time, he joined forces with the other Zamorakian Mahjarrat. It clearly shows Hazeel and Khazard are close to each other as they stand together at all times, whether it being political debate or combat. It’s also shown that Hazeel has little love for his other Zamorakian Mahjarrat friends as he didn’t really care when Lucien was killed by the Dragonkin. Later, in the Sixth age during Sliske’s grand ascension, he again showed this indifference when the Zamorakian Mahjarrat were refused access to the citadel.

Thankfully, the two split branches of story somewhat come together when Zamorak gathers a group of specialists to steal the Stone of Jas from Sliske in Dishonour among Thieves. If Hazeel was freed by the now World Guardian, he is happy to help Zamorak and likes the idea of having his savior on their side. If the World Guardian didn’t free Hazeel, it will show that Hazeel has missed the ritual and still has his skeletal face, unlike the other rejuvenated Mahjarrat. That doesn’t matter, though, as Hazeel has returned without any help but the power of love and friendship when he sensed Zamorak’s return. Before joining the party in Daemonheim, Hazeel requests the World Guardian to free his furry friend Jerrod from the Ardougne prison. During the heist, Hazeel and Khazard show they have some control over the Shadow Realm and are therefore able to spot Sliske’s shadow orbs. In the end, the heist somewhat fails, but Zamorak is able to use the Stone briefly to regain his lost power. Hazeel had shown to be loyal to Zamorak, and the god is pleased with his contribution.

The Mahjarrat’s powers were draining at a fast pace, and a new ritual was required. The only Mahjarrat not to show up to this ritual was Sliske. At the ritual site, Zaros and Zamorak appeared, claiming they had similar issues with their power draining. Zaros devised a plan to do one last ritual to end all rituals. Though Zamorak didn’t like the idea of helping Zaros, he finally agreed to Zaros’ deal thanks to Hazeel persuading him. At the end of the ritual, they sacrificed the elder god Mah and their Rejuvenation issues were over. After the ritual, Hazeel claims he will use his newly obtained power to make his cult great again and reclaim the Shadow World, the latter being quite ambitious as Sliske’s control over the Shadow Realm is unrivalled at that point.

This is where the story ends for now. Hazeel is a powerful Mahjarrat/Mahserrat who always seems to do the dirty work in combat when others like Azzanadra and Sliske are more cunning. He is mostly known to be a father figure to Khazard, and Zamorak sees Hazeel as a brother. This is quite interesting seeing as during the last ritual, it is revealed that Zamorak is Khazard’s actual father. In my opinion, Hazeel is a cool and mostly overlooked Mahjarrat who is more of a side character to the whole Mahjarrat soap drama. Hazeel does show, however, he doesn’t like the drama too much as he’s indifferent to almost anything Mahjarrat related that doesn’t concern himself, Khazard or Zamorak. One final note of trivia: during Dimension of Disaster (non-canon), Zemouregal reveals that Hazeel became king of Ardougne with the help of Phillipe Carnillean, who turned out to be a rebel because he never met the World Guardian.